Try Before You Buy! A Beginner’s Guide To Forex Currency Trading

Currency trading is the buying and selling of currencies from around the world. It is the largest and most active trade happening, making trillions of dollars daily. Unlike other trade like stock exchange, currency trading has no specific time of trading. It happens 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

In currency trading, there are currency pairs. A currency pair consists of two currencies, one of which is being bought and the other is the currency used to buy the other currency. Take a look at this example: GBP/USD where GBP is the British Pound. The GBP is what we call the ‘base currency’ which has the initial value of 1. This is the currency being bought. Next is the USD or the US dollar. This is what we call the ‘quote-currency’ and has the value of how much one of the base currency is worth. For example: EUR/USD 1.2436, one Euro is worth 1.2436 US dollars. If you need 1000 Euro, you’d have to exchange it for 1243.6 US dollars. Other major currencies traded are Canadian dollar (CAD), Japanese Yen (JPY), Australian dollar (AUD, and the Swiss Franc (CHF).

The same basic strategies apply to e-currency trading as with futures trading. Supply and demand dictates price primarily. You could buy e-currency that has historically performed well (buying the trend) or go the opposite way and buy those that are under-performing, looking for a turn-around. You can even chart them if you like.

Leverage, that double-edged sword that Futures Traders are so familiar with is also present in e-Currency Trading. You can borrow against your portfolio to buy more e-currency. The compounding affect is almost outrageous. Some would argue that you never have to pay back the leverage. I contend that it is paid back if you closed your e-Currency account, because your final balance would be less the amount leveraged. The point here is the leverage in futures trading is often times the demise of a well intended trader versus the leverage afforded an e-currency trader combined with the daily compounding affect creates portfolio growth at a phenomenal rate. It is not uncommon to see portfolio growth of 20 – 40% per month.

As mentioned, currency trading occurs 24 hours on a daily basis. Traders can decide when to trade their currencies. As changes could happen any time, the trader should always keep watch on the best time to trade. Currency trade does not need a big capital to start. Beginners can start with small amounts and eventually increase their trading resources. There is also no need to play on all currencies on the market. A novice can focus on two currencies at first while getting the hang of it and then expand later on for bigger profits.

There are a few things to watch out for as a new investor. Be sure to choose a dependable registered broker. Be sure to research the company before you commit. Avoid trading mishaps by trying out a Forex currency trading demo first. There are some great demos available on the Web to help you become familiar with the Forex market and how it works. Most Forex currency trading brokers will allow you to have a free 30 day trial of their software making “paper” transactions to see what you can do. Beware of those companies or websites that promise “untold riches” with the Forex market. As with any investment, there is always risk no matter what their claims. Forex currency trading is a fabulous business opportunity, but without the usual headaches of running a company. Understand your risks, start small with your investments, and watch your portfolio grow with Forex currency trading!

Frank Miller has a Debt Consolidation Blog & Finance, these are some of the articles: Forex Tips And Methods To Trade And Profit By You have full permission to reprint this article provided this box is kept unchanged.

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